Total solution prevents flooding at Drax Power Station

Disruptions due to flooding on the Chieveley by-pass (M4 / A34 interchange) in Berkshire are being kept to a minimum thanks to high-quality servicing from Xylem Water Solutions, the premier supplier of water and wastewater solutions and service.

Disruptions due to flooding on the Chieveley by-pass (M4 / A34 interchange) in Berkshire are being kept to a minimum thanks to high-quality servicing from Xylem Water Solutions, the premier supplier of water and wastewater solutions and service.

This stretch of road was redeveloped around three years ago and partly because of the dip in the road, four Flygt NP3201 surface water pumps and two Flygt NP3127 ground water pumps were installed to remove excess water and maintain a safe, drivable road surface.

Xylem Water Solutions was tasked by Balfour Beatty Infrastructure Services working on behalf of the Highways Agency, with the maintenance of these pumps which involves an audio-visual check each month and a major service twice each year. The latter involves removing the pumps – which weigh up to 700 kg - using an electric hoist which necessitates closing the inside lane.

However, due to the busy nature of this stretch of road, the lane can only be closed for a few hours outside peak periods, so ​Xylem Water Solutions engineers have to work quickly to carry out all necessary inspections and remedial work before they are replaced.

Dick Willoughby, Service Engineer for Xylem Water Solutions, commented: “These are heavy duty pumps which have to be able to cope with potentially very heavy rainfall draining down onto this stretch of road and are pumping the water away at up to 50 litres / second. They simply cannot be out of action for long periods as exposing the road to rainfall without the pumps being operational could lead to the road surface becoming dangerous or even impassable.

“During the major bi-annual service, we worked very closely with Balfour Beatty to get the pumps moved, serviced and replaced within a five-hour period to keep disruption to an absolute minimum.”